We’re so excited to offer our third annual CelebrateSurvivor photography contest. Here is the information you need to become involved either as a nominee or someone nominating a special person in your life. Please follow this blog as well as our CelebrateSexy blog (http://www.celebratesexy.com/) and call the studio 602-393-9333 to vote for your favorite story. We will be accepting entries until Novemeber 15th and the winner will be announced November 30th. You can left click on the card below to enlarge.

2011%2BCelebrateSurvivors Third Annual CelebrateSurvivor Contest

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Meet Elise . . .

November 11, 2011

Vote for Elise to win our CelebrateSurvivor contest by calling the studio 602.393.9333 to share your vote with us. Contest ends November 22nd.

I am a 2 1/2 year survivor of triple negative breast cancer. I was diagnosed on 5-18-09, at the age of 41. I have undergone several surgeries, chemo, radiation and numerous hospital visits due to complications and infections. I missed the first day of kindergarten and the first day of high school for my kids, due to my first chemo treatment. I also lost my father to lung cancer halfway through my journey. I had attempted a couple of different support groups locally and had difficulties finding the support I needed. I then created a private support group on Facebook by the name of Pink Links. This has been an inspiration to me and many others so that we do not have to go this journey alone. I vow to try to make this group a “safe haven” free of all drama. I want everyone to feel welcomed and not chastised for how they feel, or what they say. Which is a problem that I ran into with a local support group that I was a part of leadership in. I have 3 kids, 16 year old twins and a 7 year old, all boys. My husband and I are approaching our 21st wedding anniversary. I wish to eventually make the Pink Links into something that can assist many more women and help to give them some hope and love at the end of the dark tunnel of cancer.
Thank you, Elise ote for Elise to win our CelebrateSurvivor contest please call the studio 602.393.9333 and share your vote with us. Contest ends November 22nd.

I am a 2 1/2 year survivor of triple negative breast cancer. I was diagnosed on 5-18-09, at the age of 41. I have undergone several surgeries, chemo, radiation and numerous hospital visits due to complications and infections. I missed the first day of kindergarten and the first day of high school for my kids, due to my first chemo treatment. I also lost my father to lung cancer halfway through my journey. I had attempted a couple of different support groups locally and had difficulties finding the support I needed. I then created a private support group on Facebook by the name of Pink Links. This has been an inspiration to me and many others so that we do not have to go this journey alone. I vow to try to make this group a “safe haven” free of all drama. I want everyone to feel welcomed and not chastised for how they feel, or what they say. Which is a problem that I ran into with a local support group that I was a part of leadership in. I have 3 kids, 16 year old twins and a 7 year old, all boys. My husband and I are approaching our 21st wedding anniversary. I wish to eventually make the Pink Links into something that can assist many more women and help to give them some hope and love at the end of the dark tunnel of cancer.
Thank you, Elise

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Meet Stacey . . .

November 11, 2011

Vote for Stacey to win our CelebrateSurvivor contest by calling Images by Kay & Co. Photography studio 602.393.9333 to share your vote with us. Contest ends November 22nd.

My name is Stacey. I was diagnosed with Ductal Carcinoma In Situ in November 2008, at the age of 34. I am now 36 years old and doing better than ever!!! Cancer, you got nothing on me Baby!!!!

In November 2008, I had done a self breast exam in the shower and found a lump. After talking to my husband, we decided I needed to get into the doctor the next day to have it examined. My doctor was very concerned and sent me for my first mammogram and breast ultra sound later the same week. The breast clinic then scheduled me for biopsy the following week. It turned out that although I did have cancer in my milk ducts, the lump I’d found was not cancerous, but was the catalyst to finding the cancer and ultimately saving my life!

The weekend following the biopsy was the longest weekend I’d ever had. I didn’t receive my results until the following Tuesday. I’ve never been so scared in all my life. On the way to the doctor that Tuesday afternoon, I told my husband that if I got the results that I did in fact have cancer, I needed him to take me to my mother’s house afterward so I could tell her. I knew this was not news that I could share over the phone. I also knew it would be a tough subject to discuss as so many forms of cancer have ravaged our family.

My doctor had set up the appointment with the surgeon for two days later. The surgeon explained that, per the biopsy results, the cancer ran through the milk ducts from one side of my breast all the way across and that a mastectomy of the right breast was the best option. He also explained that when medically necessary to remove one breast, the insurance would pay to have the other removed as well, if we chose that path. I would have a few days to think about my options before meeting with him again to schedule a surgery date.

Now, please understand that all I’d done for the past week or so was cry my eyes out. So while sitting in the surgeons office, the doctor had given my husband and I a moment to soak all of the information in. My sweet husband, in a attempt to at least make me smile reminded me that when we were dating, I’d always said that I wanted a boob job when we got rich…now the insurance would cover that cost. Little did I know, this was to be the first of many silver linings we’d need to find during this long journey, in order to keep our sanity.

My husband also suggested that over the next few days, until we met with the surgeon again, I should talk to my girlfriends who knew someone, or who had themselves, been through breast cancer to decide if I should just have the right breast removed or have both removed. He knew in his heart what his decision would be, but he also knew that this was the most major decision I’d ever made and that I would have to live with this for the rest of my life. After talking to and meeting many survivors, who had had lumpectomy or only one breast removed and had recurrences later in the other breast, I decided to have both breasts removed and not have any breeding ground left for more cancer to grow. Surgery was then scheduled for November 26, 2008, the day before Thanksgiving.

Now, many people thought this was a horrible day to have surgery and that it would interfere with the upcoming holiday. I, however, did not look at it that way at all. I knew the best Thanksgiving I could have, was to wake up to have the doctor tell me they were able to remove all the cancer from my body. Thanksgiving would then, and forever, hold and extra special meaning in my heart.

Recovery after surgery was especially difficult as I had never experienced such pain before in my life. It took a village of friends and family and my Prince to walk me through the days that were to come. I’m so grateful for all the support and love I received as my body healed.

January 2009 brought chemotherapy. When ready for my hair to fall out, my husband cousins and I had a head shaving party where I ended up with a Pink Mohawk for the day, then ultimately bald. That was my way of saying – “Screw Cancer, I’ll beat you yet”. It’s the one thing I had control of while my body was fighting the disease.

From June 2009 to December 2009, I underwent reconstruction. Expanders, fills, silicone gel implants, then nipples and tattooing. The final outcome is new upgraded me!!!

Today I’m extremely active in the Susan G Komen Phoenix Affiliate and volunteer as a Community Outreach Ambassador. I’m passionate about sharing the message of early detection. I feel I reach one person who acts, than my efforts and my journey through cancer were worth it and not in vain!!!

Boobyliscious Meet Stacey . . .
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Meet Kristy . . .

November 11, 2011

Vote for Kristy to win our CelebrateSurvivor contest by calling Images by Kay & Co. Photography studio 602.393.9333 to share your vote with us. Contest ends November 22nd.

My name is Kristy. I am 37 years old. I was diagnosed with Invasive Ductal Carcinoma at the age of 31 years old. I under went a bilateral mastectomy and then had reconstruction surgery a year a later. Im a mother of two daughters ages 16 & 11. My mother lost her battle to breast cancer at age 50 in 2000, my aunt lost her battle to breast cancer at 50 in 2001. Im a strong supporter of breast cancer awareness, early detection and in finding a cure.
Thank you,
Kristy

2011 10 02%2B12 wonder Meet Kristy . . .
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Meet Paula . . .

November 11, 2011

Vote for Paula to win our CelebrateSurvivor contest by calling Images by Kay & Co. Photography studio 602.393.9333 to share your vote with us. Contest ends November 22nd.

My name is Paulla. I am a survivor last, wife, mother, daughter, sister and friend first. I have chosen to determine what cancer is in my life.

In 2001, I was 28 years old and complained of a tender lump in my left breast. I was a mother of two young children and was told that I was too young for breast cancer. For 7 years, at every yearly exam, I was told that the lump was nothing and that I was too young. Finally, I found my voice. The lump had become painful and I was experiencing tingling and numbness in my fingers. I boldly told my physician that she was wrong. Two weeks letter I received my mammogramand ultrasound, was sent to a Breast Center and on the first day of school, was diagnosed with Stage 3C Invasive Ductal Carcinoma.

Thanks to the amazing staff at the John C. Lincoln Breast Center, I was launched into treatment quickly with the group of doctors that they recommended and began chemotherapy about ten days after diagnosis. I pushed through 8 chemo treatments, with three weeks inbetween each. I had a double mastectomy with immediate reconstruction, 32 days of radiation and a full hysterectomy, all in about 18 months. My husband, children and family were amazing with the love and support that they provided.

Unfortunately, one month after being diagnosed, my father was hospitalized with Leukemia. We both experienced the harsh side effects of chemotherapy together, encouraging eachother and sharing time just sitting together. One month after that, he passed away. He showed me Gods grace even in difficult times and he gave me a lot of strength to push and finish my treatments strong. I missed months of football and softball tournaments, school events and church functions, but was in the battle for my life, for my husband, for my children.

I am a three year survivor and I now have the priviledge of working for the same Breast Center that diagnosed me. I educate the public on Breast Health and Breast Cancer Awareness on a regular basis, as well as, aiding women in their journey of breast cancer by providing resources for financial and psycho-social support. I am on the leadership board for the Phoenix Affiliate of Young Survival Coalition and have the priviledge of meeting many amazing women, as well as see them finish strong through treatments.

My amazing husband of sixteen years is my best friend and never left my side. My children are my biggest cheerleaders and the rest of my family and freinds are gifts from God. Although the journey was hard, it changed me for the better. It made me stronger, grateful and faithful. God had a plan for my life and how amazing to be living that plan for him.
Picture%2B080 Meet Paula . . .
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Meet Carol . . .

November 11, 2011

Vote for Carol to win our CelebrateSurvivor contest by calling Images by Kay & Co. Photography studio 602.393.9333 to share your vote with us. Contest ends November 22nd.

“Listen to your instincts”
(The journey of a breast cancer survivor who pursued her instincts even though several test results came back negative)

In September 2009 my best friend was diagnosed with breast cancer. Even though her breast cancer was caught early, she opted to have a double mastectomy. Her mother died of breast cancer and she didn’t want to have the fear of it returning and the surgery gave her better odds that it would stay in remission. We invited my friend to stay at our home and were her caregivers following her surgery. In accompanying her to her follow-up visits with her doctor, I came to know a wonderful surgeon. I would come to learn that her surgeon is one of the most respected and competent surgeons in the Valley.

Fast forward to July 2010, two months after turning 60. I received the shocking news that I had breast cancer. I know that everyone who hears this diagnosis is in initial shock, but I think it is even more of a shock for women like me who never had breast cancer in their family. I am the youngest of three girls and no one on either side of our family had breast cancer. My story as to how my cancer was discovered is somewhat unique and that’s why I felt compelled to write this article.

When I was thirty, I learned that I had fibrocystic disease. Both of my breasts were comprised of dense tissue. Over the years I would feel several cysts during self examinations. And over the years several doctors would aspirate the cysts. A needle would be inserted into the cyst and a large syringe would be filled with a brown fluid. The fluid would be sent to a lab for testing and it would always come back negative. I have to admit that I became rather blasé about doing self exams, because I would feel so many lumps and assumed that they would be benign cysts. Interestingly enough, though, I recall a doctor many years ago telling me that don’t think that just because I have a history of these benign cysts, that I couldn’t develop cancer. It’s kind of frightening that he was right!

My story is being told, because as I mentioned, it is very unique and I want to make sure that women don’t become blasé about this issue. In June 2009 I had my well-woman exam. My mammogram and ultrasound were scheduled for the same visit (these two procedures have been routine for me for several years). Both tests came back negative. I sensed something was wrong, however, because I was experiencing shooting pain in my right breast that would come and go. I was also experiencing a discharge from the nipple of my right breast and this was random as well. My husband and I referred to them as “mystery spots”. They were circular and brownish in color. They would appear on my side of the sheet every day, every few days or maybe a week would go by. There was no consistent pattern with them. I called my gynecologist and went to have this checked out in January 2010. The physician’s assistant squeezed my nipple and performed a test with the little bit of fluid she was able to get and came back into the exam room shortly thereafter, with the news that it wasn’t cancer. Needless to say, I was relieved, but still wondered why I was experiencing pain and the occasional discharge from my nipple. My gynecologist ordered another mammogram and ultrasound. The results of both tests came back negative. So since I had two mammograms and two ultrasounds come back negative, I decided to wait and see what the results of my next well woman exam in June of 2010 would be.

June 2010 rolled around and I discussed the same two symptoms with my gynecologist – the random pain and discharge from my nipple on my right breast. My routine mammogram and ultrasound were scheduled and just like the previous two procedures performed in June 2009 and six months later in January 2010, the results came back negative for these two tests as well. I knew it was time to look into this a little further. I decided to see a surgeon, but not just any surgeon. I went to see my friend’s surgeon.

Little did I know that when I was getting to know my friend’s surgeon the year before, that I would actually become a patient of hers. My first feelings were that of gratefulness because of the confidence that I felt with this surgeon after witnessing my friend’s experience with her.

Upon my initial visit with my surgeon, everything appeared to be normal. I shared with the doctor my concern over the random pain and nipple discharge from my breast. During my exam, she said that she didn’t think there was anything to worry about, but as a precaution she asked if it would be okay for her to aspirate a nodule that she felt in my breast. I said “of course”. After all, I had been used to being poked with needles over the years, because as I mentioned, several doctors chose to aspirate my cysts. My surgeon displays an enormous amount of compassion, and this was evident as she poked me three times before being able to aspirate a small amount of fluid. She stated that the specimen would be sent off to the lab, but was optimistic that it would most likely be benign.

The results came back while my husband and I were back in St. Louis visiting family. My surgeon, not knowing that we were on vacation, called me and shared that the tissue looked normal, but there were some atypical cells which, in her opinion, needed further evaluation. After sharing her thoughts and options with us, we agreed that she would remove the nodule upon our return to Phoenix. I have to admit, that I was not at all surprised by the results of this test. I’m not a doctor, but when I saw the tiny bit of fluid which she had aspirated during my initial visit I thought that something wasn’t right. For years I had been used to seeing the large syringes fill with a watery-like brown fluid. The fluid that my surgeon aspirated appeared thick, and not to mention it was a very minuscule amount (unlike what I was used to seeing).

My first surgery was performed on July 27, 2010. My surgeon removed the nodule in question during a rather brief, out-patient procedure. My suspicions were confirmed when my husband and I met with my surgeon to review the pathology report. The nodule proved to have cancer cells in it. To be exact, I was diagnosed with DCIS (Ductal Carcinoma in Situ). After the initial shock, I began to feel blessed because if there is such a thing as a “good” cancer, this type would be one. My surgeon explained to us that this type of cancer is non-invasive, non-aggressive and does not usually go into the lymph nodes.

After the diagnosis of DCIS, I was scheduled for a breast MRI. This procedure defines the margins of the cancer so that the surgeon knows the exact location and amount of cancer cells that needs to be removed.

My second surgery was performed on August 27, 2010. The pathology results left me feeling frustrated. The tissue my surgeon removed was negative, however, the margins were too close and she needed to go back in for a third time before the radiation could be conducted. Now, before I go any further, I have to explain why a third surgery was necessary, because a few well-meaning friends questioned the necessity of the third surgery. As we understood it, DCIS is more difficult to remove as it appears as small calcifications, as opposed to a tumor which is more readily identifiable. And another important side note to this is that my surgeon is known for breast conservation during surgery and will try to preserve the shape of the breast as much as possible while still removing the cancer.

All of this being said, my husband and I were still uneasy about my undergoing a third surgery. During our meeting with my surgeon, we weren’t convinced that I needed to undergo a third surgery and were concerned also about any possible negative effects of the radiation treatments. After all, I had basically discovered the cancer on my own. The three mammograms and ultrasounds over the past year all came back negative. Why couldn’t I just monitor my condition on my own? The tissue from the second surgery came back negative, so we were happy with that news. Why couldn’t I just have another mammogram and ultrasound in six months? My surgeon, not being comfortable with what we were thinking, suggested that we meet with an oncologist for a consultation so that we could get answers to our many questions and concerns. We agreed and the next day we met with an oncologist.

We spent two hours visiting with the oncologist. We walked away with the knowledge that our thought of personally monitoring myself in another six months was clearly not an option. The oncologist was very direct, thorough and also very compassionate. He answered all of our questions and eased our concerns. He thoroughly explained the procedure that I would undergo regarding the radiation treatments. As a cancer patient, you will hear of the importance of surrounding yourself with a great team of doctors. We have been blessed with such a team. We have a tremendous amount of confidence in my surgeon and oncologist.

My third surgery was performed on September 27, 2010. Do you see a pattern here? All three surgeries were performed on the 27th of the three consecutive months (#27 is going to heretofore be my new lucky number!).

During our visit with my surgeon to receive the results of the pathology report from my third surgery, we learned that the tissue she removed was negative, and even though one of the four margins was still close, I would be able to begin my radiation treatments – thank God, no more surgeries!

Once I had healed adequately from my third surgery, I began my radiation treatments. I received my schedule which indicated that I would be receiving a total of 35 treatments. My husband, who has always been so protective and loving, insisted on accompanying me to every treatment – Monday through Friday at 9:30 am. We both found our visits to the treatment center to be extremely inspirational. My husband, who would be waiting in the lobby, was in awe of the strength of the women he saw coming and going every morning. He would say that he could see the look of determination of every woman that entered/left the center – it was a look that said they were going to beat this disease!

I have learned so many things through my journey of becoming a cancer survivor. The saying that cancer doesn’t discriminate is very true, but the good news is that it doesn’t have to be the end of your life. It can be the beginning of many, new and exciting adventures in life. The most important message that I would like to convey is that we need to be vigilant about our bodies. When something doesn’t seem right, follow your instincts and pursue it to the nth degree. Because of my unique situation of not having my cancer show up on the three mammograms and three ultrasounds I had over the course of a year, I don’t want anyone to think that mammograms are unnecessary if they don’t always detect cancer. My case is highly unusual and early detection is still very crucial to successfully beating cancer. What I can’t stress enough is that I sensed something was wrong, due to the random pain and discharge from my nipple, so be sure to have anything out of the ordinary checked out.

I am fortunate to be married to a very optimistic individual whose glass is always half-full. He has taught me that challenges in life can be turned into wonderful and unexpected opportunities. Don’t let a diagnosis of having cancer define you as a “victim” – accept the challenge and live life to its fullest. I have always believed that “everything happens for a reason” so I choose to believe that my mission was to give hope to anyone diagnosed with cancer, that you can and you will be a survivor! Today, many more cancer patients than ever are victorious over this disease. That’s the message I wish to send and why I choose to wear my pink breast cancer awareness ribbon upside down. It forms a “V” for victory, and my prayers and hope are that all who are diagnosed with breast cancer will be “victorious” in their journey to fight this disease.
 Meet Carol . . .

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Meet Jennifer . . .

November 11, 2011

Vote for Jennifer to win our CelebrateSurvivor contest by calling Images by Kay & Co. Photography studio 602.393.9333 to share your vote with us. Contest ends November 22nd.

Jen has been nominated by Patti Parker-Phillips (our 2010 CelebrateSurvivor Winner) . . .

When Jen was in 11th grade her mom was diagnosed with breast cancer. At a young age she became aware of the realities of breast cancer when her mother had to have a radical mastectomy and went through chemotherapy and radiation. Because of this Jen understood her own risk and knew she would have to be careful and attentive to her own body and at 30 started having mammograms.

She decided on a career path in health and fitness. She chose early on to eats, live and practice HEALTHY lifestyle choices– doing the things that literature and research said helps keep cancer away…

Yet this was not the case with my beautiful friend. Her mammograms came back clear at first, then she gained 50+ lbs within a few months time and knew something was really wrong so she went to the endocrinologist to find out that every single hormone n her body was out of whack so they started her on all sorts of different medications. The weight remained and nothing seemed to help! This went on for a while then in March of 2008 she went to a new endocrinologist who knowing her mom’s history with breast cancer put her on a drug for prolactin levels – trying to get a handle on all of this. During this time she found out her mother’s cancer had returned. Jen’s plan was to go back home to WV and see her in July. But on June 6th 2008 she woke up and saw significant visual changes in her breasts. This prompted a call to her OB/GYN who immediately ordered a diagnostic mammogram & ultra sound. The results came back confirming a breast cancer diagnosis for Jen. In July she had a double mastectomy the tumor the Dr. removed was 7.5 cm and was found to have spread to lymph nodes in her neck. Never did Jen imagine she and her mother would have to be fighting this battle at the same time.

Chemotherapy began in August of 2008 and Jen stepped up her research of the hormone fed cancer she had and got rid of over $400 worth of beauty products, switched to all organic makeup, body wash, shampoo etc… Started eating cleaner and in 3 months lost most of the weight. She also worked out diligently throughout her chemotherapy and credits her lifestyle and activity with eliminating the horrible side effects of chemotherapy, well all those except for the hair loss. Radiation followed and when it was finished she was officially in ‘remission’. Unfortunately a January 2010 PET scan showed the cancer had not only come back but come back with a vengeance. It had spread toher bones and all the lymph nodes in my neck & chest wall were involved. Chemo time again coupled with more research and additional healthy lifestyle changes, she gave up all meat except for seafood, ALL processed foods and the only sugars she had were those in fruit because the body can process these and they are ok. Her thought being “if God made it you can eat it, if man made it don’t eat it”! Again she worked out religiously and did not suffer the often debilitating side effect from chemotherapy other than hair loss!

Her 2nd round of treatment and battle #2 ended in May of 2010 and she was officially put back in ‘remission’. She also chose to have a hysterectomy after confirming that she did have the BRCA gene which shows a predisposition to breast and other female cancers. She became actively engaged in helping survivors and those going through treatment to understand food, supplements and healthy lifestyle choices using her first hand knowledge of the disease and her education and experience in the health and fitness field to try to help others get through the difficulty of treatment and recovery. Unexpectedly on June 29, 2011 a progressive ‘off’ feeling manifested itself in a sudden extreme illness and Jen ended up in the ICU for over a week when pneumonia caused her left lung to collapse and her right lung to be so full of fluid that only a ¼ of it was working. Chest tubes were put in and unfortunately cancer cells were found in the fluid they removed from her lung. For the 3rd time in 3 years cancer had invaded her life.

Jen continues to amaze and astound me with her fighting spirit and her winning attitude. She chose not to have reconstruction and instead enjoys the freedom to be ‘any size’ she wants depending on her mood and her activities. She jokes about being the first ‘boobless’ stripper and believes that breast or the lack thereof do not define her as a woman.
Sadly Jennifer’s mother lost her battle with breast cancer on October 8th of this year. Jen and her husband chose to move her father to Arizona not wanting him to be alone and not want him to remain in West Virginia and be so far away from them. She and her husband have also suffered the loss of her grandfather in June and his husband’s grandfather in July. 2011 has not been kind.

On October 25th Jen went in to see her oncologist with the hope that she would be getting the last round of chemo for her most recent recurrence and was instead told that her cancer has progressed and they would need to change her treatment. So much for one so young! This woman has battled breast cancer more times than any person should have to. It has taken so much away from her. But she maintains her desire to help others, deals with her treatments exuding grace and composure through it all. She refuses to let cancer win and does not let it get her down.
I have met many amazing woman in the past 3 years that I have been on this journey and this woman is one in a million and would make an excellent 2011 Celebrate Survivor winner….

 Meet Jennifer . . .
 Meet Jennifer . . .
 Meet Jennifer . . .

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Coming in October . . .

September 7, 2011

We’re so excited to start preparations for our third annual CelebrateSurvivor Portrait Contest. Keep your eye on the blog to see how you can get involved and help us create amazing things for amazing women!

CelebrateSurvivorLogo 300x150 Coming in October . . .

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This could be you . . .

September 7, 2011

CelebrateSexy and flirty 200x300 This could be you . . .

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Heels Up?

July 29, 2011

CelebrateSexy4 199x300 Heels Up?

There’s more than one way to wear a bra . . .  and sometimes the most sensual part of an image is what you DON’T see . . .

Bring in a sexy pair of shoes, some awesome nylons and enjoy one of our Sexify add-ons to any Diva Package. Trust us . . . he’ll love it!

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